Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Welcome

My books from 2015 are available for the following languages:
  1. Dutch
  2. French
  3. German
  4. Italian
  5. Portuguese
  6. Russian
  7. Spanish
  8. Swedish
  9. Esperanto
  10. Finnish
  11. Polish
  12. Turkish
  13. Ukrainian
Each one has the 200 most frequently used words for the respective language, and up to 30 simple example sentences for each word. They have all been revised and should be 100% accurate.

Download them free here.

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Check this blog from time to time for updates on my books. Depending on how useful they are to people, I might expand them.

Also, I will post frequency lists with translation in this blog, for many languages.

Good studies, and remember... Learning languages is a wonderful exercise for your brain.

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Finally, please do not paste the contents of this blog into your site, instead, link directly here! Your support for the author is appreciated.

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Index of blog posts:

Frequency lists:
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Russian Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Japanese Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Korean Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used French Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Spanish Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Mandarin Chinese Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used German Nouns

> The 2980 Most Frequently Used German Nouns (With Plural)

The 1000 most frequently used spanish words
The 100 most frequently used spanish words + 1000~ example senteces

List of sentences, with audio on Anki, sorted by the average frequency of the words on them:
5000 Spanish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest *
5000 German Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 French Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest *
5000 Dutch Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Polish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Turkish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Russian Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest *
5000 Italian Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest *

*Update 23/06/2017 — Now the first few thousand sentences have audio for the English translation, too. 

The English audio is optional and can be enabled on the computer version of Anki, by clicking on the deck, then going "Browse", "Cards".

This also allows you to choose what you want in the front and back of the cards. So if you don't like "audio on front, sentences on the back" — you can change it by clicking "Browse", "Cards".

If you have trouble enabling the English audio, email me: neribrandao2@gmail.com

- Also available on Anki - 
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Everything should be accurate. 

If you have doubts about the accuracy, consult a dictionary or Google Translate and you will vouch for the accuracy. 

If you do find a mistake though, tell me and I'll fix it immediately.

Also check:
Study Hints 
The Problem With Frequency Dictionaries

External links:
> Tatoeba project
> Wiktionary project
> Collection of sentences from native speakers

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I was getting automated spam everyday so I disabled new comments. But as usual you can still reach me at: neribrandao2@gmail.com

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"Without music, life would be a mistake" -Nietzsche

Thursday, November 30, 2017

The *Firstest* Thing You Should Do When Learning a Language


Learn 100% flawless pronunciation.

It's MUCH easier to memorize a word's meaning when you know the correct pronunciation.

This is because the sound a word makes is always eerily reminescent of it's meaning.

Examples:



People were asked which of these two pictures they would call "bouba" and which they would call "kiki".
95~98% selected the curvy as bouba, and the spiky as "kiki".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouba/kiki_effect



The words for "love, life, happiness" usually have a pleasing sound no matter the language they're in. "death, disease, famine" usually don't sound like something beautiful or pleasing, regardless of language.



In almost every language, the words for "woman" and "girl" have lot's of I's, E's and A's.

The words for "man" and "boy" have the letter "o" more often and less I's and E's. 

Probably because we associate womanliness with acute sounds, such as the ones in I and E... Manliness with less acute sounds like "o".



"Consider the phrase "come hither." Notice that you gesture this idea by holding your palm up and flexing your fingers toward yourself as if to touch the lower part of the palm. Amazingly, your tongue makes a very similar movement as it curls back to touch the palate to utter "hither" or "here". "Go" involves pouting the lips outward, whereas "come" involves drawing the lips together inward."

And most amazing:

"The anthropologist Brent Berlin has pointed out that the Huambisa tribe of northern Peru have over thirty different names for thirty bird species in their jungle and an equal number of fish names for different Amazonian fishes. If you were to jumble up these sixty names and give them to someone from a completely different sociolinguistic background—say, a Chinese peasant—and ask him to classify the names into two groups, one for birds, one for fish, you would find that, astonishingly, he succeeds in this task well above chance level even though his language doesn‘t bear the slightest shred of resemblance to the South American one. I would argue that this is a manifestation of the bouba-kiki effect, in other words, of sound-shape translation."

The last two quotes from Chapter 6 of The Tell-Tale Brain (about how language came to be; an absolute must read for language learning enthusiasts).


Gabriel Wyner said that if you don't learn 100% flawless pronunciation right from the very start, you will end up learning two languages instead of one. Don't find out about it the hard way.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Study Hints



  • If you see a word and immediately check it's translation, you'll hardly memorize it at all. If you try your best to recall what the word means before checking the translation, the chances of memorization are much better.



  • It is much easier to memorize a word's meaning when you know how to pronounce it corretly, so get it right.   



  • Go to Youtube and search for as many videos as possible about how to learn pronunciation on your target language. Don't limit yourself to a couple videos: see as many as you can because sometimes one video will get something wrong, so the other videos will fix it.










  • Exercise improves your mood and gives you more energy to study. Find something that works for you: pick an exercise routine that doesn't bore you to tears and that you don't mind repeating. Perhaps you'll want to invest on some quality noise-isolating headphones to listen to music or to an audiobook while exercising. 
    • I have a personal theory that simply standing up is an awesome exercise because you are lifting a huge weight of ~70kg while doing it, so I have a standing desk. (~70kg = your bodyweight)








  • If you want to type some sentences of my books into Google Translate (to see alternative translations, to hear the pronunciation) you might want to learn how to type faster. "Touch typing" is a technique in which you type with all ten fingers of your hand, and when you get good at it you can type as fast as you're reading this sentence. It's a skill that takes little time to master and will be useful all your life. You can learn it by searching "touch typing" on google or visiting the following sites. http://www.keybr.com/ and https://www.typingclub.com/





  • "Fluent Forever" is the book that made me start this blog in the first place and it's an awesome read as it contains lots of language learning advice. 





Wednesday, June 21, 2017

1000 Italian Words Sorted by Frequency of Use

This list contains the 1000 most frequent italian words, sorted by frequency.

Credits to wiktionary.

The full thing can be downloaded, for free, here: https://anonfiles.cc/file/570d420778a682be3ec83f42b2d10e75

Preview:

1. non

Etymology

From Latin nōn.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): [non]

Adverb

non
1.          not
2.          un-

 

2. che

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ˈke/
             Hyphenation: che
             Rhymes: -e

Etymology 1

From Latin quid.[1], from Proto-Indo-European *kʷid, compare *kʷis.

Pronoun

che
1.          who
2.          what
3.          which

Etymology 2

From Latin quod, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kʷod-.

Conjunction

che
1.          that
2.          than
3.          when

References

               ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, page 139

 

3. di

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /di/, [d̪i]
             Rhymes: -i
             Stress: dì
             Hyphenation: di

Etymology 1

From Latin (the name of the letter D).

Noun

di f (invariable)
1.          The name of the Latin-script letter D/d.; dee
See also
             (Latin script letter names) lettera; a, bi, ci, di, e, effe, gi, acca, i, i lunga, kappa, elle, emme, enne, o, pi, cu, erre, esse, ti, u, vu, doppia vu, ics, ipsilon, zeta (Category: it:Latin letter names)

Etymology 2

From Latin .[1]

Preposition

di
1.          of; ’s (but used after the thing owned and before the owner)
               L’ira di Apollo — “Apollo’s wrath” (literally, “The wrath of Apollo”)
               la coda del cane — “the dog’s tail”
               Canto dello sciatore — “Song of the skier”
               Dichiarazione Universale dei Diritti dell’Uomo — “Universal declaration of the Rights of [the] Man”
               Simbolo degli Apostoli — “Signs of the Apostles”
               Manifesto della cucina futurista — “Manifesto of the futurist kitchen”
               Dei delitti e delle pene — “Of [the] crimes and [of the] punishments”
2.          from
               Lei è di Monreale in Sicilia, ma adesso vive a Roma. — “She's from Monreale in Sicily, but she now lives in Rome”.
3.          by, of, ’s
               La mia canzone preferita degli U2? 'One' ! — “My favorite song by U2? 'One'!”
               La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri — “The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri” or “Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy”
4.          than
               Jack è più alto di sua moglie, Joan. — “Jack is taller than his wife, Joan.”
               Biden ha detto che l'economia USA è in condizioni peggiori di quanto pensasse. — “Biden says US economy is in worse shape than he thought.”
5.          (in superlative forms) in, of
               Pont Neuf è il più antico ponte di Parigi. — “Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge in Paris.”
6.          about, on, concerning
               Euclide scrisse diversi libri di matematica. — “Euclid wrote many books on mathematics.”
               Parliamo di sentimenti. — “Let's talk about feelings.”
7.          (expressing composition) of, made of, in or more often omitted
               Sei Nazioni: la Scozia gioca con l'Italia in un incontro decisivo per il 'cucchiaio di legno' . — “Six Nations: Scotland meet Italy today in a wooden-spoon decider.”
               Ho comprato una collana d'oro bianco — “I bought a white gold necklace”.
8.          (followed by an infinitive) to or omitted
               Lei ha detto di non preoccuparsi. — “She said not to worry.”
               Che devo fare se penso di avere un virus nel mio computer? — “What should I do if I believe I have a virus on my computer?.”
9.          some
               Vuoi dell'acqua? — “Would you like some water?”
Usage notes
             When followed by the definite article, di combines with the article to produce the following combined forms:
             The i can additionally optionally be elided before vowel sounds to form d'.
Derived terms
Terms derived from di

See also

             da

References

               ^ Angelo Prati, ""Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano"", Torino, 1951

 

4. e

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /e/
             Rhymes: -e
             Stress: é
             Hyphenation: e

Etymology 1

From Latin ē (the name of the letter E).

Noun

e f (invariable)
1.          The name of the Latin-script letter E/e.; e

See also

             (Latin script letter names) lettera; a, bi, ci, di, e, effe, gi, acca, i, i lunga, kappa, elle, emme, enne, o, pi, cu, erre, esse, ti, u, vu, doppia vu, ics, ipsilon, zeta (Category: it:Latin letter names)

Etymology 2

From Latin et.[1]

Alternative forms

             (before a vowel) ed

Conjunction

e
1.          and

See also

             ed

References

               ^ Angelo Prati, ""Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano"", Torino, 1951

 

5. la

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /la/
             Rhymes: -a

Etymology 1

From Latin illa(m), feminine form of ille.[1]

Article

la f sg (plural le)
1.          the
Usage notes
             The article la elides with words that begin with a vowel, becoming l'.

Pronoun

la f sg (plural le)
1.          her (direct object)
2.          it (feminine)
               ...una improvvisa timidezza però la immobilizza... (Pasolini) - ...a sudden timidity immobilized her though...

Etymology 2

Noun


Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
La (nota)
Wikipedia it
la m (invariable)
1.          (music) la (musical note)
2.          (music) A (musical note and scale)
Derived terms
             la maggiore
             la minore

References

               ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, page 127

Anagrams

             al

 

6. il

Etymology

From the older form lo, via an intermediate form l, from Latin illum, ultimately from ille. The initial i is a svarabhakti vowel added to the form l in order to make the pronunciation easier.[1]

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /il/

Article

il m sg (plural i)
1.          the

References

               ^ Patota, Giuseppe (2002) Lineamenti di grammatica storica dell'italiano (in Italian), Bologna: il Mulino, ISBN 88-15-08638-2, pages 123, 124

Anagrams

             li,

 

7. un

Etymology

From uno, from Latin ūnus (“one”).

Article

un m (see uno)
1.          an, a

Noun

un m (see uno)
1.          one

Adjective

un m (see uno)
1.          one

Pronoun

un m (see uno)
1.          one

Anagrams


             nu

1000 French Words Sorted by Frequency of Use

This list contains the 1000 most frequent french words, sorted by frequency.

Credits to wiktionary.

The full thing can be downloaded, for free, here: https://anonfiles.cc/file/90416cbdc470db512742183583b438bd

This is the 1.0 draft, in the next draft I will enumerate the words (for example: 1.de 2.je 3.est ... and so on). They are not enumerated but they are sorted by frequency.

Preview:

de

Etymology

From Latin .

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /də/
             Rhymes:

Preposition

de
1.          of (expresses belonging)
            1837, Louis Viardot, chapter I, in L’Ingénieux Hidalgo Don Quichotte de la Manchefr.Wikisource, translation of El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra:
            Dans une bourgade de la Manche, dont je ne veux pas me rappeler le nom, vivait, il n’y a pas longtemps, un hidalgo ....
            In a village of La Mancha, whose name I do not want to remember, lived, not long ago, an hidalgo ....
               Paris est la capitale de la France. ― Paris is the capital of France.
               En 1905, les églises devinrent la propriété de l'État. ― In 1905, churches became the property of the state.
2.          of (used to express property or association)
               Œuvres de Fermat ― Fermat’s Works
               Elle est la femme de mon ami. ― She is my friend’s wife.
               le voisin de Gabriel ― Gabriel's neighbor
3.          from (used to indicate origin)
               Elle vient de France. ― She comes from France.
               Êtes-vous de Suisse ? ― Are you from Switzerland?
               Ce fromage vient d’Espagne. ― This cheese is from Spain.
               C’est de l’ouest de la France. ― It’s from the west of France.
               Le train va de Paris à Bordeaux. ― The train goes from Paris to Bordeaux.
4.          of (indicates an amount)
               5 kilos de pommes. ― 5 kilograms of apples.
               Un verre de vin ― A glass of wine
               Une portion de frites ― A portion of fries
5.          used attributively, often translated into English as a compound word
               Un jus de pomme ― An apple juice
               Un verre de vin ― A glass of wine
               Une boîte de nuit ― A night club
               Un chien de garde ― A guard dog
               Une voiture de sport ― A sports car
               Un stade de football ― A football stadium
6.          from (used to indicate the start of a time or range)
               De 9:00 à 11:00 je ne serai pas libre.From 9 to 11 I won’t be free.
               Je travaille de huit heures à midi. ― I work from 8 o'clock to noon.
               un groupe de cinq à huit personnes ― a group of [from] five to eight people
7.          used after certain verbs before an infinitive, often translating into English as a gerund or an infinitive
               J’ai arrêté de fumer. ― I stopped smoking.
               Il continue de m’embêter. ― He keeps annoying me.
               Elle m’a dit de venir. ― She told me to come.
               Nous vous proposons de venir. ― We suggest you to come.
8.          by
               Boire trois tasses par jour réduirait de 20 % les risques de contracter une maladie. ― Drinking three cups a day would reduce the risk of catching an illness by 20%.

Usage notes

Before a word beginning with a vowel sound, de elides to d’. Before the article le, it contracts with the article into du, as shown in the example above. Before the article les, it contracts with the article into des.
Le Songe d’une nuit d’été — “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Literally, “The Dream of a night of summer”)
La queue du chien — “The dog’s tail”
Index des auteurs — “Index of the authors”

Article

de
1.          (indefinite) some; any (in questions or negatives)
               Je voudrais de la viande. ― I would like some meat.
               Est-ce qu'il y a de la bonne musique ? ― Is there any good music?
               Nous cherchons du lait. ― We're looking for some milk.
2.          (negative) a, an, any
               Elle n'a pas de mère. ― She does not have a mother.
               Il n'a pas de crayon. ― He does not have a pencil.
               Je n'ai pas de temps. ― I do not have any time.

Usage notes

In the positive, de is usually used with a definite article, as in the examples. In the negative, without an article.

Derived terms

             (contractions): d’, du, des

Anagrams

             ed, éd.

External links

             de” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

je

Etymology

From Old French jo, from Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Near cognates include Spanish yo and Italian io. Further cognates include Ancient Greek ἐγώ (egṓ), Russian я (ya) English I, German ich, etc.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ʒə/
             Rhymes:

Pronoun

je (first person singular, plural nous, object me, emphatic moi)
1.          I

Usage notes

             When several pronouns are included in the same sentence, it is considered impolite to say the pronoun je first; it must be the last one, and tu must be said after third persons (this applies also for toi and moi):
            Nous irons, Rose, toi et moi.
            You, Rose, and I will go.

Derived terms

             j'

Related terms

French personal pronouns

External links

             je” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

est

Etymology 1

From Old French, from Old English ēast.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ɛst/

Adjective

est m, f (invariable)
1.          east

Noun

est m (plural est)
1.          east

Synonyms

             orient, levant

Etymology 2

From Latin est, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /ɛ/

Verb

est
1.          third-person singular present indicative of être
Derived terms
             c'est

Anagrams

             set, Ste., tes

External links

             est” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

pas

Etymology

From Latin passus. Its use as an auxiliary adverb comes from an accusative use (Latin nec...passum) in negative constructions – literally ‘not...a step’, i.e. ‘not at all’ – originally used with certain verbs of motion.

Pronunciation

             IPA(key): /pa/, /pɑ/

Noun

pas m (plural pas)
1.          step, pace, footstep
2.          (geography) strait (e.g., Pas de Calais, ""Strait of Dover"")

Derived terms

             à pas de loup

Adverb

pas
1.          (ne ... pas) not
               Je ne sais pas.‎ ― I don't know
2.          (colloquial) not
               J’veux pas travailler.‎ ― I don't wanna work.
               (abbreviation of: Je ne veux pas travailler.)

Derived terms

             pourquoi pas
             je ne comprends pas

Related terms

             passage
             passer

External links

             pas” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).