Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Welcome

My books from 2015 are available for the following languages:
  1. Dutch
  2. French
  3. German
  4. Italian
  5. Portuguese
  6. Russian
  7. Spanish
  8. Swedish
  9. Esperanto
  10. Finnish
  11. Polish
  12. Turkish
  13. Ukrainian
Each one has the 200 most frequently used words for the respective language, and up to 30 simple example sentences for each word. They have all been revised and should be 100% accurate.

Download them free here.

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Check this blog from time to time for updates on my books. Depending on how useful they are to people, I might expand them.

Also, I will post frequency lists with translation in this blog, for many languages.

Good studies, and remember... Learning languages is a wonderful exercise for your brain.

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Finally, please do not paste the contents of this blog into your site, instead, link directly here! Your support for the author is appreciated.

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Index of blog posts:

2015 posts

> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Russian Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Japanese Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Korean Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used French Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Spanish Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Mandarin Chinese Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used German Nouns

> The 2980 Most Frequently Used German Nouns (With Plural)

The 1000 most frequently used spanish words
The 100 most frequently used spanish words + 1000~ example senteces

2016 posts

Frequency lists neatly formatted, with English translation:

> The 500 Most Frequently Used German Words
> The 500 Most Frequently Used Spanish Words
> The 500 Most Frequently Used French Words

A frequency list similar to those three above is in the making for: Classic Latin, Portuguese, Turkish and Esperanto.

List of sentences, with audio on Anki, sorted by the average frequency of the words on them:

5000 Spanish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 German Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 French Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Dutch Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Polish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Turkish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Frequent Verbs:

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Everything should be accurate. 

If you have doubts about the accuracy, consult a dictionary or Google Translate and you will vouch for the accuracy. 

If you do find a mistake though, tell me and I'll fix it immediately.

Also check: 
Study Hints 
The Problem With Frequency Dictionaries.

neribrandao2@gmail.com

Thursday, November 30, 2017

The *Firstest* Thing You Should Do When Learning a Language


Learn 100% flawless pronunciation.

It's MUCH easier to memorize a word's meaning when you know the correct pronunciation.

This is because the sound a word makes is always eerily reminescent of it's meaning.

Examples:



People were asked which of these two pictures they would call "bouba" and which they would call "kiki".
95~98% selected the curvy as bouba, and the spiky as "kiki".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouba/kiki_effect



The words for "love, life, happiness" usually have a pleasing sound no matter the language they're in. "death, disease, famine" usually don't sound like something beautiful or pleasing, regardless of language.



In almost every language, the words for "woman" and "girl" have lot's of I's, E's and A's.

The words for "man" and "boy" have the letter "o" more often and less I's and E's. 

Probably because we associate womanliness with acute sounds, such as the ones in I and E... Manliness with less acute sounds like "o".



"Consider the phrase "come hither." Notice that you gesture this idea by holding your palm up and flexing your fingers toward yourself as if to touch the lower part of the palm. Amazingly, your tongue makes a very similar movement as it curls back to touch the palate to utter "hither" or "here". "Go" involves pouting the lips outward, whereas "come" involves drawing the lips together inward."

And most amazing:

"The anthropologist Brent Berlin has pointed out that the Huambisa tribe of northern Peru have over thirty different names for thirty bird species in their jungle and an equal number of fish names for different Amazonian fishes. If you were to jumble up these sixty names and give them to someone from a completely different sociolinguistic background—say, a Chinese peasant—and ask him to classify the names into two groups, one for birds, one for fish, you would find that, astonishingly, he succeeds in this task well above chance level even though his language doesn‘t bear the slightest shred of resemblance to the South American one. I would argue that this is a manifestation of the bouba-kiki effect, in other words, of sound-shape translation."

The last two quotes from Chapter 6 of The Tell-Tale Brain (about how language came to be; an absolute must read for language learning enthusiasts).


Gabriel Wyner said that if you don't learn 100% flawless pronunciation right from the very start, you will end up learning two languages instead of one. Don't find out about it the hard way.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Study Hints



  • If you see a word and immediately check it's translation, you'll hardly memorize it at all. If you try your best to recall what the word means before checking the translation, the chances of memorization are much better.



  • It is much easier to memorize a word's meaning when you know how to pronounce it corretly, so get it right.   



  • Go to Youtube and search for as many videos as possible about how to learn pronunciation on your target language. Don't limit yourself to a couple videos: see as many as you can because sometimes one video will get something wrong, so the other videos will fix it.










  • Exercise improves your mood and gives you more energy to study. Find something that works for you: pick an exercise routine that doesn't bore you to tears and that you don't mind repeating. Perhaps you'll want to invest on some quality noise-isolating headphones to listen to music or to an audiobook while exercising. 
    • I have a personal theory that simply standing up is an awesome exercise because you are lifting a huge weight of ~70kg while doing it, so I have a standing desk. (~70kg = your bodyweight)








  • If you want to type some sentences of my books into Google Translate (to see alternative translations, to hear the pronunciation) you might want to learn how to type faster. "Touch typing" is a technique in which you type with all ten fingers of your hand, and when you get good at it you can type as fast as you're reading this sentence. It's a skill that takes little time to master and will be useful all your life. You can learn it by searching "touch typing" on google or visiting the following sites. http://www.keybr.com/ and https://www.typingclub.com/





  • "Fluent Forever" is the book that made me start this blog in the first place and it's an awesome read as it contains lots of language learning advice. 





Saturday, September 17, 2016

Learn Spanish Reading Harry Potter y La Cámara Secreta on Anki

When you want to have fun learning a language, you can always listen to an audiobook. But doing that, a few problems arise: 1) You might take 3 seconds to understand a sentence. But the narrator doesn't wait for you to understand it, and keeps on speaking. What was he speaking again? Oh my god, he's already speaking another sentence! It's easy to get lost. 2) If you missed a sentence, it's a burden to go back to the sentence you missed. Do I have to go back to 2:43? Or is it 2:20? Or is it 2:25? Where the hell is that sentence that I missed? Having to go back on the audio all the time is a chore. 3) If a sentence contains a new word that you haven't seem before, you can't mark it to review it later. Because audiobooks can't be marked. Fortunately, all those 3 annoying problems are solved with Anki!

Anki is a learning software that can be downloaded here:
http://ankisrs.net/

The Anki deck can be downloaded here:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/1381053131

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- To make this deck, I downloaded the spanish book, told Office Word to open up a new line on every "." of the book. The result is that the book gets divided into 6500 small pieces, instead of 2000 long paragraphs. Then I took those 6500 small pieces, put them on Google Translate, voilá. Google Translate might not be 100% accurate, but it does give you a general idea of what's being said on the spanish sentence, which to me was good enough 99% of the time.

Boring legal notice: The copyrighted material in this deck is being used for nonprofit educational purposes, therefore it is considered "Fair Use" under US law.



Here is a (poorly formatted) preview of the first 30 cards:

1 1
El peor cumpleaños The worst birthday
No era la primera vez que en el número 4 de Privet Drive estallaba una discusión durante el desayuno. It was not the first time at number 4 Privet Drive exploded a discussion over breakfast.
 A primera hora de la mañana, había despertado al señor Vernon Dursley un sonoro ulular procedente del dormitorio de su sobrino Harry. Early in the morning, he had awakened Mr. Vernon Dursley a loud hooting from the bedroom of his nephew Harry.
—¡Es la tercera vez esta semana! —se quejó, sentado a la mesa—. 'It's the third time this week! he complained, sitting at the table.
 ¡Si no puedes dominar a esa lechuza, tendrá que irse a otra parte! If you can not master that owl, you will have to go elsewhere!
Harry intentó explicarse una vez más. Harry tried to explain once again.
—Es que se aburre. It's being bored.
 Está acostumbrada a dar una vuelta por ahí. It is used to walk around there.
 Si pudiera dejarla salir aunque sólo fuera de noche... If I could let her out if only at night ...
—¿Acaso tengo cara de idiota? —gruñó tío Vernon, con restos de huevo frito en el poblado bigote—. —do I have stupid face? He growled Uncle Vernon, with remnants of fried egg in the village mustache.
 Ya sé lo que ocurriría si saliera la lechuza. I know what would happen if the owl out.
Cambió una mirada sombría con su esposa, Petunia. He changed a grim look with his wife, Petunia.
Harry quería seguir discutiendo, pero un eructo estruendoso y prolongado de Dudley, el hijo de los Dursley, ahogó sus palabras. Harry wanted to discuss, but a thunderous belch and prolonged Dudley Dursley's son, drowned his words.
—¡Quiero más beicon! 'I want more bacon!
—Queda más en la sartén, ricura —dijo tía Petunia, volviendo los ojos a su robusto hijo—. —Queda More in the pan, ricura said Aunt Petunia, turning his eyes to his son robust.
 Tenemos que alimentarte bien mientras podamos... No me gusta la pinta que tiene la comida del colegio... We need to eat well while we can ... I do not like the looks of school food ...
—No digas tonterías, Petunia, yo nunca pasé hambre en Smeltings —dijo con énfasis tío Vernon—. No Nonsense, Petunia, I never went hungry in Smeltings he said with emphasis Uncle Vernon.
 Dudley come lo suficiente, ¿verdad que sí, hijo? Dudley eat enough, is not it, son?
Dudley, que estaba tan gordo que el trasero le colgaba por los lados de la silla, hizo una mueca y se volvió hacia Harry. Dudley, who was so fat that hung down the back side of the chair, grinned and turned to Harry.
—Pásame la sartén. Pass me the pan.
—Se te han olvidado las palabras mágicas —repuso Harry de mal talante. He will have forgotten the magic words Harry replied morosely.
El efecto que esta simple frase produjo en la familia fue increíble: Dudley ahogó un grito y se cayó de la silla con un batacazo que sacudió la cocina entera; la señora Dursley profirió un débil alarido y se tapó la boca con las manos, y el señor Dursley se puso de pie de un salto, con las venas de las sienes palpitándole. The effect this simple phrase occurred in the family was incredible: Dudley gasped and fell off the chair with a thud that shook the whole kitchen; Mrs. Dursley gave a weak cry and mouth with her hands over her, and Mr. Dursley stood feet, with veins throbbing temples.
—¡Me refería a «por favor»! —dijo Harry inmediatamente—. —¡Me Meant 'please'! Harry said immediately—.
 No me refería a... I did not mean ...
—¿QUÉ TE TENGO DICHO —bramó el tío, rociando saliva por toda la mesa— What do you have said bellowed uncle, spraying spit all over the table
ACERCA DE PRONUNCIAR LA PALABRA CON «M» EN ESTA CASA? ABOUT GIVING THE WORD WITH 'M' in this house?
—Pero yo... —But I...
—¡CÓMO TE ATREVES A ASUSTAR A DUDLEY! —dijo furioso tío Vernon, golpeando la mesa con el puño. How dare you scare DUDLEY! Furious said Uncle Vernon, pounding the table with his fist.
—Yo sólo... —Only me...
—¡TE LO ADVERTÍ! ¡BAJO ESTE TECHO NO TOLERARÉ NINGUNA MENCIÓN A TU ANORMALIDAD! —I WARNED YOU! Under this roof will not tolerate any MENTION YOUR ABNORMALITY!
Harry miró el rostro encarnado de su tío y la cara pálida de su tía, que trataba de levantar a Dudley del suelo. Harry looked at the red face of his uncle and his aunt pale face, trying to lift soil Dudley.
—De acuerdo —dijo Harry—, de acuerdo... 'All right,' Harry said, according ...
Tío Vernon volvió a sentarse, resoplando como un rinoceronte al que le faltara el aire y vigilando estrechamente a Harry por el rabillo de sus ojos pequeños y penetrantes. Uncle Vernon sat back, puffing like a rhinoceros who get enough air and watching Harry closely out of the corner of his small, piercing eyes.
Desde que Harry había vuelto a casa para pasar las vacaciones de verano, tío Vernon lo había tratado como si fuera una bomba que pudiera estallar en cualquier momento; porque Harry no era un muchacho normal. Ever since Harry had come home to spend the summer holidays, Uncle Vernon had treated him like a bomb that could explode at any moment; because Harry was not a normal boy.


Friday, August 19, 2016

5000 Polish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made:

1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used Polish words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 20 000 translated Polish sentences from the internet 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest.



The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.



The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/2036344821
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/


To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.

5000 Turkish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made: 1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used turkish words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 30 000 translated turkish sentences from the internet 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest.

The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.


The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/1290591096
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/


To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.

5000 Russian Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made:

1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used Russian words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 60 000 translated Russian sentences from the internet, each sentence no longer than 5 words. 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest.


The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.


The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/1555716615
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/

To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.