Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Welcome

My books from 2015 are available for the following languages:
  1. Dutch
  2. French
  3. German
  4. Italian
  5. Portuguese
  6. Russian
  7. Spanish
  8. Swedish
  9. Esperanto
  10. Finnish
  11. Polish
  12. Turkish
  13. Ukrainian
Each one has the 200 most frequently used words for the respective language, and up to 30 simple example sentences for each word. They have all been revised and should be 100% accurate.

Download them free here.

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Check this blog from time to time for updates on my books. Depending on how useful they are to people, I might expand them.

Also, I will post frequency lists with translation in this blog, for many languages.

Good studies, and remember... Learning languages is a wonderful exercise for your brain.

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Finally, please do not paste the contents of this blog into your site, instead, link directly here! Your support for the author is appreciated.

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Index of blog posts:

2015 posts

> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Russian Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Japanese Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Korean Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used French Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Spanish Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used Mandarin Chinese Nouns
> The 2000 Most Frequently Used German Nouns

> The 2980 Most Frequently Used German Nouns (With Plural)

The 1000 most frequently used spanish words
The 100 most frequently used spanish words + 1000~ example senteces

2016 posts

Frequency lists neatly formatted, with English translation:

> The 500 Most Frequently Used German Words
> The 500 Most Frequently Used Spanish Words
> The 500 Most Frequently Used French Words

A frequency list similar to those three above is in the making for: Classic Latin, Portuguese, Turkish and Esperanto.

List of sentences, sorted by the average frequency of the words on them:

5000 Spanish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 German Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 French Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Dutch Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Polish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest
5000 Turkish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Frequent Verbs:


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Everything should be accurate. 

If you have doubts about the accuracy, consult a dictionary or Google Translate and you will vouch for the accuracy. 

If you do find a mistake though, tell me and I'll fix it immediately.

Also check: 
Study Hints 
The Problem With Frequency Dictionaries.

neribrandao2@gmail.com

Thursday, November 30, 2017

The *Firstest* Thing You Should Do When Learning a Language


Learn 100% flawless pronunciation.

It's MUCH easier to memorize a word's meaning when you know the correct pronunciation.

This is because the sound a word makes is always eerily reminescent of it's meaning.

Examples:



People were asked which of these two pictures they would call "bouba" and which they would call "kiki".
95~98% selected the curvy as bouba, and the spiky as "kiki".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouba/kiki_effect



The words for "love, life, happiness" usually have a pleasing sound no matter the language they're in. "death, disease, famine" usually don't sound like something beautiful or pleasing, regardless of language.



In almost every language, the words for "woman" and "girl" have lot's of I's, E's and A's.

The words for "man" and "boy" have the letter "o" more often and less I's and E's. 

Probably because we associate womanliness with acute sounds, such as the ones in I and E... Manliness with less acute sounds like "o".



"Consider the phrase "come hither." Notice that you gesture this idea by holding your palm up and flexing your fingers toward yourself as if to touch the lower part of the palm. Amazingly, your tongue makes a very similar movement as it curls back to touch the palate to utter "hither" or "here". "Go" involves pouting the lips outward, whereas "come" involves drawing the lips together inward."

And most amazing:

"The anthropologist Brent Berlin has pointed out that the Huambisa tribe of northern Peru have over thirty different names for thirty bird species in their jungle and an equal number of fish names for different Amazonian fishes. If you were to jumble up these sixty names and give them to someone from a completely different sociolinguistic background—say, a Chinese peasant—and ask him to classify the names into two groups, one for birds, one for fish, you would find that, astonishingly, he succeeds in this task well above chance level even though his language doesn‘t bear the slightest shred of resemblance to the South American one. I would argue that this is a manifestation of the bouba-kiki effect, in other words, of sound-shape translation."

The last two quotes from Chapter 6 of The Tell-Tale Brain (about how language came to be; an absolute must read for language learning enthusiasts).


Gabriel Wyner said that if you don't learn 100% flawless pronunciation right from the very start, you will end up learning two languages instead of one. Don't find out about it the hard way.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Study Hints



  • If you see a word and immediately check it's translation, you'll hardly memorize it at all. If you try your best to recall what the word means before checking the translation, the chances of memorization are much better.



  • It is much easier to memorize a word's meaning when you know how to pronounce it corretly, so get it right.   



  • Go to Youtube and search for as many videos as possible about how to learn pronunciation on your target language. Don't limit yourself to a couple videos: see as many as you can because sometimes one video will get something wrong, so the other videos will fix it.










  • Exercise improves your mood and gives you more energy to study. Find something that works for you: pick an exercise routine that doesn't bore you to tears and that you don't mind repeating. Perhaps you'll want to invest on some quality noise-isolating headphones to listen to music or to an audiobook while exercising. 
    • I have a personal theory that simply standing up is an awesome exercise because you are lifting a huge weight of ~70kg while doing it, so I have a standing desk. (~70kg = your bodyweight)







  • If you want to type some sentences of my books into Google Translate (to see alternative translations, to hear the pronunciation) you might want to learn how to type faster. "Touch typing" is a technique in which you type with all ten fingers of your hand, and when you get good at it you can type as fast as you're reading this sentence. It's a skill that takes little time to master and will be useful all your life. You can learn it by searching "touch typing" on google or visiting the following sites. http://www.keybr.com/ and https://www.typingclub.com/




  • "Fluent Forever" is the book that made me start this blog in the first place and it's an awesome read as it contains lots of language learning advice. 





Friday, August 19, 2016

5000 Polish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made:

1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used Polish words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 20 000 translated Polish sentences from the internet 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest.



The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.



The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/2036344821
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/


To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.

5000 Turkish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made: 1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used turkish words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 30 000 translated turkish sentences from the internet 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest.

The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.


The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/1290591096
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/


To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.

5000 Russian Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made:

1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used Russian words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 60 000 translated Russian sentences from the internet, each sentence no longer than 5 words. 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest.


The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.


The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/1555716615
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/

To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.


5000 Swedish Sentences Sorted from Easiest to Hardest

Here's how this list was made: 1) I grabbed a list with the 5000 most frequently used swedish words -- sorted from the most frequently used, to the least. 2) I grabbed 15 000 translated swedish sentences from the internet 3) I wrote a program that assigns a Frequency Rank Number to each word from every sentence, this Frequency Rank Number based on the list mentioned on item "1)" 4) This program calculates the average value of the all the words' Frequency Rank Numbers. And assigns this value to the sentence. The result is that if a sentence contains advanced words, the sentence will have a high Average Frequency Rank Number. If a sentence contains only beginner words, the AFRN will be low. 5) Finally, I sorted the sentences: from the ones with the lowest AFRN, to the highest. The end result is that this list begins with very, very simple sentences, and new words get slowly introduced as you progress.



The best part is, an expanded version of this list(with audio!) is available for you to study on the learning software Anki:
https://ankiweb.net/shared/info/209865065
For free, of course.

If you don't have Anki, you can download here: http://ankisrs.net/


To view in a big screen, click the "See Original" button.